AN INTERESTING CONVERSATION –

read it till the end.

*** An atheist professor of philosophy speaks to his class on the problem science has with God, The Almighty. 

He asks one of his new students to stand and….. 
=============================================== 
Prof 
: So you believe in God? 

Student
 : Absolutely, sir. 

Prof
 : Is God good? 

Student
 : Sure. 

Prof 
: Is God all-powerful? 

Student
 : Yes. 

Prof
 : My brother died of cancer even though he prayed to God to heal him.  Most of us would attempt to help others who are ill. But God didn’t. How is  this God good then? Hmm? 

(
 Student is silent.) 

Prof
 : You can’t answer, can you? Let’s start again, young fellow. Is God good? 

Student
 : Yes. 

Prof
 : Is Satan good? 

Student
 : No. 

Prof
 : Where does Satan come from? 

Student
 : From…God… 

Prof
 : That’s right. Tell me son, is there evil in this world?  Student: Yes.   

Prof
 : Evil is everywhere, isn’t it? And God did make everything. Correct?  Student: Yes. 

Prof
 : So who created evil? 

(
 Student does not answer.) 

Prof
 : Is there sickness? Immorality? Hatred? Ugliness? ß All these terrible things exist in the world, don’t they? 

Student
 : Yes, sir. 
Prof
 : So, who created them? 

(
 Student has no answer.) 

Prof 
: Science says you have 5 senses you use to identify and observe the world around you. Tell me, son…Have you ever seen God? 

Student
 : No, sir. 

Prof
 : Tell us if you have ever heard your God? 

Student
 : No, sir. 

Prof
 : Have you ever felt your God, tasted your God, smelt your God? Have  you ever had any sensory perception of God for that matter? 

Student
 : No, sir. I’m afraid I haven’t. 

Prof
 : Yet you still believe in Him? 

Student
 : Yes.  

Prof
 : According to empirical, testable, demonstrable protocol, science says your GOD doesn’t exist. What do you say to that, son?

Student 
: Nothing. I only have my faith. 

Prof
 : Yes , Faith ! And that is the problem science has. 

===============================================

Student: Professor, is there such a thing as heat? 

Prof
 : Yes. 

Student
 : And is there such a thing as cold? 

Prof 
: Yes. 

Student
 : No sir. There isn’t. 

(The lecture theatre becomes very quiet with this turn of 
events.)


Student
 : Sir, you can have lots of heat, even more heat, superheat, mega heat, white heat, a little heat or no heat.. 

But we don’t have anything called cold. We can hit 458  degrees below zero which is no heat, but we  can’t go any  further after that. There is no such thing as cold. Cold is  only a word we use to describe the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold.  Heat is energy. Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the absence of it. 

(There is pin-drop silence in the lecture theatre.)


Student 
: What about darkness, Professor? Is there such a thing as darkness?  Prof: Yes. What is night if there isn’t darkness? 

Student
 : You’re wrong again, sir. Darkness is the absence of something. You  can have low light, normal light, bright light, flashing light….But if you have no light constantly, you have nothing and it’s called darkness,  isn’t  it? In reality, darkness is n’t. If it were you would be able to make  darkness darker, wouldn’t you?  Prof: So what is the point you are making, young man? 

Student
 : Sir, my point is your philosophical premise is flawed.  Prof: Flawed? Can you explain how? 

Student
 : Sir, you are working on the premise of duality. You argue there is  life and then there is death, a good God and a bad God. You are viewing the  concept of God as something finite, something we can measure. Sir, science  can’t even explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism, but has  never seen, much less fully understood either one. 

To view death as the opposite of life is to be ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a substantive thing. 

Death is not the opposite of life: just the absence of it. 

Now tell me, Professor. Do you teach your students that they evolved from a monkey? 

Prof
 : If you are referring to the natural evolutionary process, yes, of course, I do. 

Student
 : Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes, sir?  (The Professor shakes his head with a smile, beginning to realize where the  argument is going.) 

Student
 : Since no one has ever observed the process of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this process is an on-going endeavor, are you not teaching your opinion, sir? Are you not a  scientist but a preacher? 

(The class is in uproar.)


Student
 : Is there anyone in the class who has ever seen the Professor’s brain? 

(The class breaks out into laughter.) 


Student
 : Is there anyone here who has ever heard the Professor’s brain, felt it, touched or smelt it? No one  appears to have done so. So, according to  the established  rules of empirical, stable, demonstrable protocol, science  says that you have no brain, sir.  With all due respect, sir , how do we then trust your lectures, sir?   

(The room is silent. The professor stares at the student, his face
 unfathomable.)   

Prof
 : I guess you’ll have to take them on faith, son. 

Student 
: That is it sir… The link between man & god is  FAITH. That is all  that keeps things moving & alive. 

WANT TO KNOW WHO THAT STUDENT WAS

NB: I believe you have enjoyed the conversation…and if so…you’ll probably want your friends/colleagues to enjoy the same…won’t you? So do forward them to increase their knowledge… this is a true story, and the student was none other than: Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam, the Ex- President of India.

Daily Rules


Wake Up!!
Decide to have a good day. ‘Today is the day the Lord hath made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.’ Psalms 118:24


Dress Up!!
The best way to dress up is to put on a smile. A smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks. ‘The Lord does not look at the things man looks at. Man looks at outward appearance; but the Lord looks at the heart.’ I Samuel 16:7

Shut Up!!Say nice things and learn to listen. God gave us two ears and one mouth, so He must have meant for us to do twice as much listening as talking. ‘He who guards his lips guards his soul.’ Proverbs 13:3


Stand Up!!…
For what you believe in. Stand for something or you will fall for anything.. ‘Let us not be weary in doing good; for at the proper time, we will reap a harvest if we do not give up. Therefore, as we have opportunity, let us do good…’ Galatians 6:9-10


Look Up!!…
To the Lord.
‘I can do everything through Christ who strengthens me.’ Phillippians 4:13

Reach Up!!…
For something higher. ‘Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not unto your own understanding. In all your ways, acknowledge Him, And He will direct your path.’
Proverbs 3:5-6


Lift Up!!…
Your Prayers.
‘Do not worry about anything; instead PRAY ABOUT EVERYTHING.’
Philippians 4:6



Send this to the people you care about.
I thought this was mighty special, just like you.
Pass this on and brighten someone’s day, and remember:

God answers Knee-Mail.

Homemade dog treats

20 Homemade Doggie Treats Your Pup Will Love

Homemade dog treats recipes

So, here are a few homemade doggie treats recipes that you can make today.

Homemade Dog Treats with Bacon Peanut Butter Glaze – Pinch of Yum

Healthy Homemade Dog Treats – Wholefully

Chewy Sweet Potato Dog Treats – Bitz n Giggles

Homemade Peanut Butter Dog Treats – Sally’s Baking Addiction

Carrot Banana Natural Dog Treats – 17 Apart

Homemade Chicken Jerky – Proud Dog Mom

Frozen Coconut Oil and Blueberry Dog Treats – Hello Nature

Peanut Butter Pupcakes with Milk Bone Topper – Sunny Sweet Days

Copycat Frosty Paws – Not Quite Susie

Peanut Butter Gummies – Dream a Little Bigger

Chewy Cheddar Puppy Puffs – Bitz n Giggles

Homemade Apple Chip Dog Treats – First Home Love Life

Frozen Peanut Butter Berry Pops Dog Treats – A Cultivated Nest

Doggie Veggie Frittatas – Proud Dog Mom

Sweet Potato Pretzel Dog Treats – Brown-Eyed Baker

Pops Pizza Dog Treats – The Cottage Market

Dog Waffles – The Homespun Chics

Frozen Dog Treats – Baking Mischief

Dog Donuts – Sunny Day Family

DIY Chicken Jello Dog Treats – Proud Dog Mom

Now, check out these healthy homemade dog treats recipes for a few more ideas.

Great pass around snacks! From Betty Crocker.

Cheesy spinach and artichoke cups.

Spinach-Artichoke Dip Cups
  • Prep 10 MIN
  • Total25 MIN
  • Servings16

Ingredients

  • 1package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2cup Italian cheese blend (2 oz)SAVE $
  • 1clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1/4teaspoon salt
  • 1/4teaspoon pepper
  • 1cup canned chopped artichoke hearts
  • 1cup frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed to drain
  • 16slices sweet Hawaiian bread

Steps

  • 1Heat oven to 375°F.
  • 2In medium bowl, mix all ingredients except bread.
  • 3Use round cutter to cut large circle from center of each slice of bread. Discard scraps, or save for another use. Gently press bread rounds into 16 ungreased regular-size muffin cups. Divide dip mixture evenly among bread cups.
  • 4Bake about 15 minutes or until bread is golden brown. Serve immediately.

CHOCOLATE SOUP By Darlene Buechel

In 1968, Easter preparations started on Saturday when MomSupervised egg-dyeing. Mom boiled a few dozen eggs and while they cooled, Dennis, DianeAnd I gathered supplies including broken crayons, dye tablets, andVinegar. We dropped a colored tablet in each of six bowls, addedBoiling water and vinegar, and then stirred to make tablets fizz andColors pop. Before using a spoon to carefully dip an egg into one of thePretty pastel colors, I’d grab a crayon and neatly print “Darlene” onOne egg. Dennis and Diane followed suit. That way, when we huntedOn Easter morning we’d be sure to snag the right basket. Being 8-years-old, I was an Easter veteran, but I was quick toRemind younger sister Diane of the rules: 1. If you find someone else’s basket quietly put it back(without stealing eighteen jelly beans) and continue the hunt. 2. If your basket isn’t found by fifteen minutes before churchYou have to continue looking after church. That year I was the un-lucky looker who didn’t find her basketBefore church so I spent the whole hour at St. Mary’s plotting myHunt. The next Easter was a different story since I was lucky enoughTo find my basket first. I was jumping up and down and ogling theBig chocolate rabbit in my basket when Mom and Dad told us to getDressed. Diane and I donned new ruffled dresses and pinned whiteDoilies on our heads while Dennis grumbled his way into dress pantsAnd jacket. I proudly left my basket in the sun porch before heading out the door. Dennis and Diane pouted the whole three blocks to church, but IMerrily skipped into the bright April sunshine even though my newWhite patent leather shoes pinched a little. After church mySiblings ran ahead but I was content to walk between Mom and DadSince I’d already found my basket and huge, chocolate bunny. As I skipped up the porch steps I figured Dennis found his tooSince he was laughing his head off. “Hungry for chocolate soup?” Dennis laughed. I guessed he was being a ding-a-ling since our Easter menuIncluded ham, mashed potatoes, and lime green Jell-O — never soup. One look at Dennis’ pointed finger made me realize the trueDing-a-ling was the girl who left her Easter basket out on the sunPorch on a very sunny day. My beautiful chocolate rabbit was now aChocolate puddle. Dennis finally stopped laughing when Mom threatened to make himTrade rabbits with me. After that, Diane gave a joyful screech asShe pulled her basket from its cozy hiding spot. After lunch, when we were finally allowed to dig into ourBaskets, I opened my chocolate puddle box. When I broke off a pieceAnd popped it in my mouth, I couldn’t help but smile as I realized itWas still yummy and sweet — just like most of my childhood EasterMemories.

This very quick pasta dish uses fresh tomatoes and basil tossed with Italian salad dressing and Parmesan cheese. It’s a great meal to prepare in the …

This very quick pasta dish uses fresh tomatoes and basil tossed with Italian salad dressing and Parmesan cheese. It’s a great meal to prepare in the …

This very quick pasta dish uses fresh tomatoes and basil tossed with Italian salad dressing and Parmesan cheese. It’s a great meal to prepare in the …

The Magic Key

By David “Goose” Guzzetta

It was a cool September morning when we piled into a rusty blue university van and began our journey across one of the great divisions in our society: affordable housing. Our group of fifteen college students was heading to Milwaukee to help build homes in a poor inner-city neighborhood with Habitat for Humanity. After passing through miles of farmland that slowly segued into subdivisions and strip malls, we were soon driving through city neighborhoods where the homes were older and packed tightly into plots protected by chain link fences. As we drove on, we saw many homes and businesses boarded up. That’s also when our idle conversation boarded up into stunned silence. Weaving through a maze of old row houses and empty lots, we knew we were near the Habitat site when we saw cars lining the streets, Dumpsters and a small knot of people armed with work gloves. At the site, I told the construction supervisor we wanted the toughest job of the day. He smiled and led us to an enormous pile of debris. “I figure this pile was here before any of you were born,” he laughed, mostly to himself. “I’d like to chuck it all in the dumpster out front.” After dubbing the pile “Mount Habitat,” we began our arduous task. About two hours into our work, several children walked over and became our kid corps of sidewalk superintendents. We invited them to join us in our mountain assault, and those munchkins enthusiastically agreed. The smallest boy of the group hung back as the other children put on gloves and dug in. While I was working on a far corner of the pile, I smiled at him when he glanced my way. He strode up to me, puffed out his chest and stated, “My name’s J. T., and I’m real strong.” “Well, I can see that,” I replied. “My name is David, and I really need some help.” I grabbed a shovel that was nearby and handed it to my small helper. The shovel towered over him by a full two feet and his tiny hands couldn’t even wrap around the handle. Without a moment’s hesitation, he dug into the pile with great passion. Every few minutes he would stop, then look up at me and exclaim with pride, “I’m helping.” And each time I responded, “I don’t know what we would do without you, J. T.” He was dressed much like the other kids: blue jeans rolled up at the bottom so he could grow into them, a T-shirt dirty from the day’s adventures, and an unbuttoned well-worn red and white flannel shirt. He wore high-top basketball shoes that were purposely left untied, and upon closer inspection, I realized they were actually two different shoes. But it was his beautiful brown eyes that set him apart. When he smiled, his eyes remained wide open, which forced his cheeks to bulge out like the cheeks of a cherub. I tried to imagine what this little boy would look like when the rest of his frail body caught up with his eyes. To amuse each other, we took turns making up stories about items that we found in the pile. A rusted hubcap became a gear from a flying saucer that crashed many years ago. A beat-up old shoe and a broken cup were transformed into a priceless modern art exhibit. I found an old rusted skeleton key and created a story about a magic spaceship. When I finished telling the story, I gave J. T. The key and said, “Now you have the magic key that starts that spaceship.” He gazed at me with those huge brown eyes and ran over to his friends to show them his new treasure. J. T. And I worked side by side the entire day. I had to give up my shovel a few times when some of the adult volunteers needed one, but I always made sure my new friend had his orange-handled shovel. And then, as we were getting ready to quit for the day, a well-dressed elderly man walking with a cane called one of the children over. The man then began to yell, “Unless you’re getting paid, you git away from there and go home right now. I mean it, right now.” All of the children dropped their shovels and quickly dispersed. A woman from our group approached the man and tried to explain Habitat for Humanity’s philosophy to him. He was unfamiliar with Habitat’s work and refused to believe that people would volunteer their time and then sell the home for no profit. He turned away and continued to shout to the children. I watched J. T. As he scurried off. He slowed and seemed suspended between the urgings of his peers, the commands of the elderly man and our group. I stood silently clutching my shovel. He turned and his eyes found mine. We shared a mutual smile. Again, he ran toward his friends, but then he stopped, turned around and ran back toward me. He grasped my hand and pulled me down so that we were eye to eye. Standing on his tiptoes, he whispered in my ear, “You’ll always be my friend.” Then he pressed something into my hand and ran off with the other children. I never saw J. T. again, but I will always treasure the gift he gave me, the old rusty key to his magic spaceship.By David “Goose” Guzzetta